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Filtering by Category: misc

Top 10 Recipes of 2018

Patricia Reitz

Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - ButterYum

Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - ButterYum

2018 has been a great year for ButterYum with close to 444K page views! Here’s a list of the Top 10 most popular recipes I shared this year. Interestingly, 8 of the 10 are Keto-Friendly.

ButterYum - Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - #1    Keto Cheddar Bay Biscuits

#1 - Keto Cheddar Bay Biscuits. With over 25K views, this was, by far, my most popular recipe of 2018.

ButterYum - Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - #2    Keto Turkey Meatballs
ButterYum - Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - #3    Sous Vide Filet Mignon
ButterYum - Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - #4    Keto Pizza Crust (no cauliflower)
ButterYum - Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - #5    Sous Vide Mini Cheesecakes in a Jar
ButterYum - Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - #6    Keto Quesadillas
ButterYum - Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - #7    Frico Eggs
ButterYum - Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - #8 -    Super Flaky All-Butter Pie Crust
ButterYum - Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - #9    Homemade Cannoli
ButterYum - Top 10 Recipes of 2018 - #10    Keto Chocolate Chip Ice Cream

Well there you go. Thank you to all who visit regularly, and here’s looking forward to next year!

Russian Buttercream

Patricia Reitz

There are a number of popular buttercreams in the world. Swiss, Italian, French, and American are all fairly well known, but Russian buttercream is just starting to become known in the baking world. How does is differ from the others?

Each kind of buttercream can be flavored in various ways, but basically Italian, Swiss, and French buttercreams are made with a variety of cooked sugar syrups. They also require the use of a thermometer to ensure their respective sugar syrups reach the proper temperature (with the exception of French Buttercream, which doesn’t always require a thermometer - although it’s highly recommended for those under 5, over 80, or immune-impaired).

American Buttercream is by far my least favorite - truth be known, I don’t even think it should be called buttercream, but it’s popular with many because it’s so fast and easy to prepare, and does not require the use of a thermometer - you just dump confectioner’s sugar and butter in a bowl and mix them together.

And finally, Russian Buttercream. Russian Buttercream is as easy to make as American (actually easier), but it has the same silky smooth texture and depth of flavor as Italian, Swiss, and French. Great, great stuff. I hope you’ll give it a try.

To recap, here are the various buttercreams and how they differ:

  • Italian: made by combining a hot sugar syrup with beaten egg whites and softened butter (my personal favorite). It has a silky smooth texture, delicate flavor, and is very stable at room temperature for extended periods of time. You must use a thermometer when making Italian Meringue Buttercream.

  • Swiss: made by heating sugar and egg whites together before whipping, cooling, and adding softened butter. It has a silky smooth texture, delicate flavor, and is fairly stable at room temperature, but not quite as stable as Italian Meringue Buttercream. You must use a thermometer when making Swiss Meringue Buttercream.

  • French: made by combining a hot sugar syrup with beaten egg yolks and softened butter. It has a silky smooth texture and delicate flavor, but it’s is a little softer than Italian or Swiss Buttercream and is not very stable at room temperature. Not all recipes for French buttercream call for the use of a thermometer, but it’s recommended when feeding those under 5, over 80, or the immune-impaired.

  • American: made with softened butter and confectioner’s sugar. It’s texture is extremely gritty and the flavor is extremely sweet. It’s gross and disgusting and I cannot recommend you make it… ever.

  • Russian: made with just two ingredients… chilled sweetened condensed milk and butter. That’s it. There’s no need for a thermometer because sweetened condensed milk contains all the sugar you need and it’s already been cooked. The texture of Russian Buttercream is silky smooth. It’s pretty stable at room temperature too.

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So today my Russian Buttercream is actually going to be a Russian-Mexican fusion because I’ll be using dulce de leche in place of traditional sweetened condensed milk.

For decades home cooks would make dulce de leche by simmering unopened cans of sweetened condensed milk for hours until the milk inside would caramelize. Most people did this successfully, but there were always stories of those who were not so successful. I don’t know about you, but the thought of a can of sticky, molten caramel exploding all over my kitchen kept me from ever trying. Thankfully, at some point, sweetened condensed milk manufacturers decided to assume the risk for us, and home cooks the world over rejoiced.

Ok, that might be a stretch, but yay!

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Start with room temperature butter, about 70F.

A hand mixer works well when making a small batch of this buttercream, but you’ll want to use a stand mixer for larger batches.

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Whip the butter for 2-3 minutes until it’s light and fluffy (the photo above is after about 1 minute).

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Here we are after 3 full minutes - see how light the color of the butter is?

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Time to add the chilled dulce de leche - be sure it’s well chilled to keep the butter from getting too warm.

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Whip them together until light and fluffy, scraping the bowl as needed. You’ll want to taste it carefully and add some fine table salt to taste - just enough to highlight the butter and caramel flavors.

If you’re a fan of salted caramel, sprinkle the finished buttercream with flaked or coarse salt just before serving. Yum!

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Well, that’s all there is to it. Super, super simple, don’t you think? Next up, I’ll be sharing a fun way to use this buttercream. Until then, have a great day.

Items used to make this recipe:


Russian Buttercream w/Dulce de Leche

makes enough to frost 12 cupcakes

Ingredients

  • 1/2 pound (226g) unsalted butter at room temperature (70F)

  • 1/2 pound (226g) canned dulce de leche, chilled

  • fine table salt to taste

Directions

  1. In a medium mixing bowl, beat room temperature butter using a hand mixer for 2-3 minutes, until light in color and very fluffy.

  2. Add chilled dulce de leche and continue beating with a hand mixer for 1 minute.

  3. Taste the mixture carefully and add just enough salt to highlight the butter and caramel flavors; continue whipping for another minute or two, scraping the bowl if needed.

Note: to make salted caramel variation, sprinkle flaked or coarse salt on top of buttercream when serving.


Onigiri

Patricia Reitz

One of my daughters is a Japanophile and she loves to introduce us to Japanese foods that are completely unfamiliar to us.  Foods like these onigiri (oh-nee-gee-dee), a rice ball or sorts.  They're kind of a rice sandwich filled with something savory like chicken or tuna salad.  The salty filling pairs so beautifully with the rice and a strip of nori is wrapped around for flavor and color contrast.  They're easy to make in the palm of your hand, but the triangular molds we used are even more fun.  Here's how they're made.

Start with about 3 cups of cooked rice.  I usually cook my rice on the stovetop, but my daughter loves any excuse to pull out the rice cooker. 

how to make onigiri, japanese rice balls - how to photos

Sushi rice is the typical rice used to make onigiri, but any rice that will stick together when compressed will work.  When you're shopping, look for Japanese medium or short grain rice. 

how to make onigiri - recipe with how to photos

As I said, you can form these in the palm of your hands, but using onigiri molds is kind of fun.  This set includes two sizes.

onigiri filling - japanese rice balls, recipe and how to photos

You'll also need a savory filling.  Today we're using this rotisserie chicken salad.  If you're interested in my yummy recipe, here it is.

how to make onigiri, japanese rice balls - recipe and how to photos

You'll also need nori sheets.  They're the same sheets you might use to make sushi. 

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Cut the sheets into 1-inch wide strips that are 3.5 to 4 inches long.

Alrighty, time to make these adorable onigiri.  Keep a small bowl of water nearby to dip your fingers into.  Sticky rice won't stick to your fingers if they're damp.

how to make onigiri, o-musubi, nigirimeshi (japanese rice balls) - recipe with how-to photos

Press a tablespoon or two of rice into the bottom half of an onigiri mold, pressing it across the bottom and up the sides, leaving an indentation for the filling.

how to make onigiri, o-musubi, nigirimeshi (japanese rice balls) - recipe with how-to photos

Add a tablespoon or so of tuna salad or chicken salad.

how to make onigiri, o-musubi, nigirimeshi (japanese rice balls) - recipe with how-to photos

Cover the filling with more rice.

how to make onigiri, o-musubi, nigirimeshi (japanese rice balls) - recipe with how-to photos

Fill the mold to the top.

how to make onigiri, o-musubi, nigirimeshi (japanese rice balls) - recipe with how-to photos

Place the lid on top and press gently to squeeze everything together.

how to make onigiri, o-musubi, nigirimeshi (japanese rice balls) - recipe with how-to photos

Gently unmold and place formed onigiri on a strip of nori.

how to make onigiri, o-musubi, nigirimeshi (japanese rice balls) - recipe with how-to photos

Pull the ends of the nori up to wrap the onigiri.

how to make onigiri (japanese rice balls) - recipe with how-to photos

Ta-da!  That's all there is to it.  Now you're ready to dig in. 

how to make onigiri, o-musubi, nigirimeshi (japanese rice balls) - recipe with how-to photos

Enjoy! 

Items used to make this recipe:


Onigiri

makes 8-12

Ingredients

  • 3 cups cooked sushi rice (or any rice that sticks together when compressed)

  • 1 cup tuna or chicken salad (try my rotisserie chicken salad recipe here)

  • 1 sheet nori seaweed, cut into 1-inch wide strips, then cut each strip in half to make 2 shorter strips (each should be 1-inch wide by 3.5 to 4 inches long).

Directions

  1. Place a few tablespoons of rice in onigiri mold, pressing across the bottom and sides of mold, but leaving an indentation for the filling.

  2. Place a tablespoon of savory filling like tuna salad or chicken salad in center of rice; cover with more rice until mold is filled.

  3. Place lid on mold and gently press to compress rice; remove lid and carefully unmold by pressing the release tab on the back of the mold.

  4. Place nori strip on table, shiny side down, and place onigiri on strip as shown; pull both ends of nori up on each side of the onigiri and serve immediately.